The Downsides To The Ketogenic Diet

Let’s talk about high fat, high protein diets, and their impact on the gut.

In the last year or so, I’ve been concerned about the stool test results I see from clients following a ketogenic diet. These diets are very low in carbs, including resistant starches.
My concerns are now being validated in the scientific literature.

When you’re on a ketogenic diet, the weight comes off but, you’re cutting back on carbs, including the healthy ones. Now, a lot of experts in the field, including dieticians, nutritionists, and naturopaths are raising concerns about the decrease in carbohydrate intake.

Carbs are essential for your overall health and your gut. If you restrict carb intake for an extended period, the gut can suffer significantly. Studies are demonstrating that people who cut their carb intake have lower levels of beneficial bacteria. They also have smaller amounts of short-chain fatty acids, which in turn reduces the amount of antioxidants available to protect cells from DNA damage.

Further readings:

Losing weight on a ketogenic diet may also mean that your aging has accelerated.
There is no doubt people who eat more protein and more fat are prone to more rapid aging than people who eat a balanced diet. Looking slim now might come at a considerable cost when you’re 60. You could end up looking ten years older.Be careful with the ketogenic diet. Consider the long-term consequences of reducing your intake of healthy carbohydrates.

You shouldn’t cut as many carbs out of your diet as you possibly can, thinking that keto is a weight-loss nirvana. The ketogenic diet may help some people in the short-term, but eventually, you’ve got to come back to ground zero and start eating a normal diet again. Thanks for tuning in, and don’t forget to click on the link below in the description box fo my full report.

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About Eric Bakker N.D.

Eric Bakker ND has completed almost ten years of study and has almost almost 25 years of clinical experience in natural and integrative forms of medicine, and has pursued continuous post-graduate study in Australia, America, India as well as in New Zealand.

Eric is the past Vice President of the NZ Natural Medicine Association and is currently on their editorial advisory board.